Wild Birds Of Autumn

Summer is now behind us though the warm weather is still lingering about, which is a good thing as last year we had the fire well and truly going by now. However, with bushfires burning nearby and warnings of hot and wild weather forthcoming, and then not as it got cold and heavy rain arrived, it’s interesting to sit on our veranda and watch the comings and goings of our feathered friends. Most have been fairly scarce during the Summer, so I haven’t had much reason to bring out my camera. But recently we’ve had an influx of a variety of birds that generally pay us a visit, so once again I’ve had a chance to take a few photographs of the characters that we call our friends. We might call them friends, but I suspect that to them we’re just odd ground dwellers that somehow have food.

Crimson Rosella - Male

Crimson Rosella – Male

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

King Parrots have been very scarce this season and I suspect that’s due to the fact that there are many new residents in Mirboo North who are buying lots of wildbird seed as well as bags of black sunflower seed, according to our hardware store, and King Parrots love black sunflower seeds. I’ve spoken to a number of the new residents and they are excited to have the parrots coming to their yards, so they buy copious quantities of seed to keep them coming back. I have warned them not to be too generous with the feed, as King Parrots can become very demanding and destructive if they get used to getting regular feed and suddenly don’t. Anyway, Crimson Rosellas have been the predominant visitors each evening; usually coming in pairs, as they do, and they are also the first to arrive when wildbird seed is put out of an evening.

King Parrot

King Parrot

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Male

Crimson Rosella – Male

Crimson Rosella - Male

Crimson Rosella – Male

Crimson Rosella - Male

Crimson Rosella – Male

The group of green coloured Rosellas sometimes arrive a little later and I thought they looked a bit odd as they are predominantly green, but they must be female Crimson Rosellas, given some descriptions that I’ve found. They come in a large flock and don’t associate with the (male) Crimson Rosellas at all, which is why I thought they were a separate breed. They are also way more aggressive towards the male Crimson Rosellas and moreso to each other, not giving an inch when it comes to the wildbird seed that’s about. But few texts seem to elaborate on this heavy green colouration which leaves me wondering. However, I doubt that the colouration is linked to a virus. One thing is for certain, Rosellas love their corn while other birds discard them right away.

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Crimson Rosella - Female (?)

Crimson Rosella – Female (?)

Then we have a mixture of regular residents that live in our yard or very close by. A family of Magpies comes and goes all the time and at least one comes to enjoy the smaller seeds that form part of the wildbird mix that I use. While the Magpie is eating, the other birds just watch and wait. We also have a group of Bronzewing Pigeons that live somewhere about, as they are always foraging in our front and back yard, though one of these is quite dominate and angrily chases away the other two if they dare come anywhere near the seeds that are on the ground. The Bronzewing also puffs up and spreads its wings when its on the feeder plate if any other bird tries to encroach. Though the Magpie is given its due respect.

Magpie

Magpie

Magpie

Magpie

Bronzewing Pigeon

Bronzewing Pigeon

Bronzewing Pigeon

Bronzewing Pigeon

And last but not least are our Blackbirds. We have several that live, I think, amongst the ferns in our front yard and which can be heard each morning singing away (I quite like the sound) and then you see them darting about in the yard looking for whatever they can find amongst the leaf litter that abounds in our yard. The Blackbirds aren’t interested in the seed at all as they prefer insects, grubs and the like, though apparently are partial to fruits and berries, especially strawberries. While an introduced species, the Blackbird doesn’t appear to be a threat to native birds and are not a nuisance at all compared to Sparrows and Indian Mynah birds. Thankfully we don’t have either Sparrows or Indian Mynah birds about. I spotted one of our Blackbirds one evening and noticed that it looked a bit worse for wear and managed to get a few photographs as it darted about and tried to avoid getting photographed. The photograph confirmed what I thought and clearly the poor Blackbird had seen better days.

Blackbird

Blackbird

I suspect that we won’t be seeing anything more exotic or unusual between now and Winter and while the weather remains reasonably warm, I think we’ll be seeing these characters for a little while longer. One day I’ll have to see if I can get access to some of the local dams and see if I can cover some of the waterbirds that habit the locality, though I don’t think I’ll be seeing such things as Kingfishers about. Kookaburras there are, but even these have been somewhat scarce in our yard. I think I’ve been saying I should get out to the dams for some time now and still haven’t progressed any further.

4 thoughts on “Wild Birds Of Autumn

  1. Ross

    That’s a nice set Ray. We also have the Black Bird foraging around ferns in the front yard (& in the chook run). We have a family of Bronzewings too that are regularly in the back yard. We also get the King Parrots & they were coming in greater numbers when we were putting out seed regularly, but the big bully Sulphur Crested Cockatoos would descend & takeover & are the worst for destruction, though I would say the Kings are not a problem there at all. The Kings love the privet seed on our neighbour’s weed trees though (bl**dy privet!). The Grey Butcher Bird is also another visitor, as is the Bower Bird, not to mention the Noisy Miners too. I shouldn’t forget the Wattle Birds, Red & Small as well as they flit about the native trees, particularly the banksias & making their calls etc.
    Anyhow, thanks for showing these Ray. Cheers, Ross.

    Reply
    1. Ray Post author

      Thanks Ross. Thankfully we don’t get the Sulphur Crested Cockatoos and very few Little Corellas. The Black Cockatoos we get are relentless when it comes to some specific trees and make an unbeleiveable mess. The King Parrots aren’t too bad now, but were a right pain in our early days until we built the veranda. We lost all of our succulents as revenge because we weren’t giving out enough feed. 🙂

      Reply
      1. Ross

        Oh yes, I forgot, the King Parrots did chomp on the Zigocactus in the hanging basket at one time (possums do damage in the hanging plants too though). I forgot to mention the Rainbow Lorikeets come too. Cheeky birds they are!

        Reply

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