The Veranda Project – Part 3

In Part 2, the internal panelling was completed and now I had to build a base (hearth) for the Chiminea, as the floor couldn’t be left in its current manner. So I went about looking for some suitable tiles that I could lay in the corner and, as luck would have it, National Tiles in Traralgon had just what I needed on discount, so I ended up getting four 600mm2 ceramic tiles. Now the larger the tile the more difficult it can be to lay but, in this instance it was a simple situation so laying four tiles wasn’t a major issue. I was careful to sand down any unevenness in the floorboards before laying down the ceramic tile underlay, making sure that it was nailed down well and then giving it a coating of underlay primer/additive. I thought that 4kg of tile adhesive would have been enough (according to the instructions) but I had to get another 1kg tub to complete the job. I even surprised myself as to how level and even it turned out, though the grouting was a pain to apply.

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

Now that the Chiminea could be put in place it needed a flue and, despite what some may recommend, it was going to have a flue. I’d been keeping an eye out everywhere for flues, but without much luck until my ever vigilant wife spotted a complete triple-wall flue kit on a local Facebook buy, swap and sell website, which was exactly what I was after. In fact, it was much more than I was after but, for the price, I was more than happy to have excess (I’m sure that I can use the excess for something). The problem was that where the flue had go straight up, it meant that I’d have to cut at the join in the corrugated iron roof, which isn’t a major problem, but would mean a lot more effort to ensure an effective weather seal. Going straight up though would be simpler to install, look better and allow proper fixing, height and positioning according to building regulations.

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

But given the weather that we’ve been having throughout Spring and now into Summer, I haven’t had any opportunity to install the flue, so that will end up being one of the last jobs for the veranda project. However, with the major parts now completed, things are looking good. There’s still some work ahead; but a light is shining at the end of the tunnel and the big ticket items are more or less completed. The doorway on the western end was one thing that I wanted done before anything else and I decided to install a glass-panel, hardwood, door to match that of the exterior doors. These are readily available and actually quite cheap (who would have thought?), so that decision was quite easy. One thing they say about painting is preparation, preparation, preparation, which is what we did before staining the door, only to realise after I’d finished the first side that the glass was covered in plastic and didn’t need the masking tape.

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

Of course installation wasn’t necessarily easy, given that the opening was anything but a standard doorway, but I had measured things up before positioning the posts, so that there was plenty of room to fit a door frame (in fact a bit too much room). I could have bought a pre-built door frame and seriously considered this, but it was a less expensive exercise to just buy appropriate hardwood and make my own door frame. The pre-built door frames were also quite deep and would have protruded a fair amount both inside and outside the posts, so I discarded that idea. Because of the steps at the western end of the veranda, I made the doorway frame a bit wider than necessary, but overall that wasn’t a major issue, as it was just a matter of getting suitable hardwood that was slightly thicker than usually used for doorways. Hanging the door and putting on a door handle wasn’t a big deal. And I almost forgot, a cooling fan was also been strategically installed to provide air over the hot Summer.

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

I was under the pump to have the western end finished for Christmas Day, for a family lunch, so I’m fairly pleased with the overall results. It’s not perfect, but for the ham-fisted wood mechanic that l am, it’s pretty good. With the door now in place, it really does finish off that side of the veranda, the wind is now under control and there’s even an added bonus of noise abatement provided by the door. The eastern end is still open, as I haven’t quite figured out what to do with that end, but as the weather rarely comes from the east, it isn’t such a problem. So…

Wherever you happen to be, have a very Merry Christmas and a great New Year in 2017. Take care and, above all else, have fun.

Update: You have to laugh. After saying that the eastern end of the veranda isn’t an issue because the weather rarely comes from that direction, after a warmish 36C day we get a rather heavy thunderstorm with lots of rain. And which end cops it? The eastern end of course.

The Veranda Project - Mirboo North Victoria

The Veranda Project – Mirboo North Victoria

The story continues at Part 4.

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