Tag Archives: Rode microphones

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K – Pt 10

No surprises that there’s now a Part 10 to this ongoing story, but as I keep modifying and improving things with my camera rig, that’s going to happen. But I’m close to having things sorted out. Anyone that’s been reading this blog and the stories about the BMPCC4K, will know that I’ve not been overly happy with the audio of the BMPCC4K. This especially relates to the 3.5mm audio input where, without several additional bits of gear, the audio recording levels of the camera have been virtually non-existent. So to fix this I’ve been using an Olympus LS-14 audio recorder, coupled with a Cayin C5 preamplifier, to boost the signal strength to something respectable. It works, but requires a bunch of cabling, battery management as well as remembering to turn on multiple devices. But all of that has come to an end, as I’ve found a much better solution in the most unexpected of places.

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Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K – Pt 9

There seems to be a never ending progression of change when it comes to my camera rig, but given the flexibility with the way that the rig is assembled, it’s not too difficult to move things around. It’s a bit like moving into a new home and working out how the furniture best fits for daily use, and what looked OK at the beginning, a few days or weeks later proves to be a poor choice and changes follow. That’s pretty much what’s been happening with my camera rig, especially as I get more hours of use under the belt. Video is so far removed from stills photography, where the camera setup really doesn’t change at all over its life unless you consider swapping lenses a change. So once again I’ll go over a few additions/changes that I’ve made to the camera rig which may or may not be subject to further change.

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Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K – Pt 8

One thing that I’ve come across on numerous forums regarding the BMPCC4K are questions about ways to effectively power the camera and get more recording time than what’s available from the standard battery. There are two regular ways to provide power to the camera, apart from using the internal battery option, and the first is by using a dummy battery connected to an external power source and the second is by using the camera’s external power connector to an external power source. It’s the external power source that seems to cause the most issues and raises the most questions regarding what external power source to use, given that many want to power accessories and not just the camera. The power requirements can be quite high if using a field monitor, external SSD, audio recorder and microphone all of which will tax a battery’s capacity.

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Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K – Pt 7

Finally I’m having some success. As I pointed out in Part 6, as a last desperate measure I’d ordered an inexpensive powered Saramonic SR-M3 directional microphone (shotgun mic) to see if that would alleviate my need for the Olympus LS-14 audio recorder. It arrived and I have to say that I was apprehensive given that there was so little information available with regards to this microphone when it came to use with the BMPCC4K. Actually, I couldn’t find anything informative. Every review was about it’s use with a DSLR or mirrorless camera for vlogging purposes, something that wasn’t going to be its intended use. I wanted to use it as a field microphone for general use on my rig, which may not have been ideal, but that’s what I needed.  As an aside, for once a product was available locally at considerably cheaper price than anything available overseas. I never cease to wonder at these price variations. There are plenty of general reviews of the Saramonic, so I’m not going to do a general review but will go straight into testing

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Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K – Pt 6

No sooner had I thought that Part 5 was the finale, I made a few more adjustments and modifications that I thought would be beneficial to describe and record. It’s possible that this could go on for some time as things change and as I get used to using the camera rig and finding better ways to do things. I guess that’s the benefit of a camera rig that can be modified to suit one’s needs, but it’s also a double edged sward as you get tempted to modify things perhaps too much at times. Though I must admit, the changes that I’ve made have been for the better, especially as far as handling goes, and that’s the important thing over anything else. Mind you, I haven’t made that many changes to the overall structure of the rig, so it’s not like I’m moving the furniture around hoping for a better arrangement to arise. Continue reading

Making Movies – Part 8

In Part 7 I covered two types of gimbal that you can use with video cameras, static and motorised. In this part I’m going to focus solely on the FeiyuTech a2000 gimbal, some accessories I have for it, and how it can be used in somewhat innovative ways using accessories that any photographer or videographer most likely owns. I’m assuming that every videographer will own at least a tripod and some will also own a slider and If not, this story may provide an incentive to do so. Some of these techniques obviously can apply to all gimbals, but some techniques may not be as easy to emulate, if the gimbal doesn’t have the features that are available on the FeiyuTech a2000 gimbal’s handle (but more on that later). I haven’t noted any blogger/reviewer comment on what I’m about to discuss, so I’m assuming that no one has given any similar thought to how you can make use of gimbals and accessories in different ways than normally envisaged.

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Motorising A Camera Slider

As if this has never been done before! Anyway, in Part 6 of Making Movies I wrote about the slider that I’d bought and noted that I was considering turning it into a motorised slider so that I could get more controlled and smoother motion. What I was achieving wasn’t too bad, but I could never quite get consistent motion across the full length of the slider and that started to become very frustrating. That convinced me even more that I needed to add a motor to the slider. But what really prompted me was when I decided to dismantle one of my old printers, salvaging any useful parts that I could remove, I came across a number of  bits and pieces like motors, belts, brackets, as well as hundreds of small screws. That spurred me to start looking at converting my slider to a motorised one, given the parts that started to pile up.

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Making Movies – Part 7

In Part 6 I discussed a range of accessories that can make movie production easier and professional looking. Hand- held gimbals are becoming a major part of this, but the cost of motorised ones had me avoiding getting one. However, after numerous failed attempts at getting the static gimbal to work with my main cameras, I was facing a very frustrating brick wall that I couldn’t penetrate. While the static gimbal is supposed to be able to handle the weight of my cameras (much like a Glidecam), I was beginning to suspect that wasn’t the case. No matter what I did and no matter how many videos I watched on how to balance this gimbal, I could not get it to work. The shoulder rig on the other hand is great but is more a substitute for a tripod in awkward situations but, when moving about, the shoulder rig shows lots of jitter and movement. The more I pondered the subject matter that I would be recording, moving about was going to be a major part of anything that I did and what I had wasn’t going to cut it.

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Making Movies – Part 6

I mentioned in Part 4 that gear wasn’t the most important thing when producing video and it’s not, but there are things that can make your video production easier and more importantly interesting, as I’ve been slowly finding out. Video production is all about conveying a story through visual impact; movement, light and manipulation of scenes, movement being one important aspect, and not forgetting sound and editing, as I mentioned in Part 5. This is how video provides the story that words provide in a book; you can’t leave it to the reader’s imagination, you have to create the imagination and that’s what I’ve been discovering. To that end, there are tools or accessories available that help you to create that imagination, as opposed to simply pointing a bare camera at things. You could achieve reasonable results with nothing more than a hand held camera, and movies have been done that way, but the results may not be as good unless that’s the effect that you want.

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Making Movies – Part 5

While the story, as discussed in Part 4, is still the most important aspect of video, there are two technical aspects that are pretty much vital to video post-production (compiling the story), software and hardware (a decent computer). As I mentioned earlier, I’ve been using Cyberlink PowerDirector for a while now because it’s not too bad a video editing suite. It’s well priced and, more importantly, it will run on my nearly 10 year old PC. So with PowerDirector and my old PC I’ve been able to produce all of my YouTube videos, but that old PC (Dell Studio XPS) has really been starting to show its age. It’s frequently rather slow, even when running moderate tasks and often running out of memory when doing several things at once. I knew that it was on its last legs as far as any photographic or video editing was concerned and my fears became more immediate when one of my monitors started to play up, which I confirmed was the graphics card starting to flounder. Getting parts for this PC was becoming difficult, so I was now more or less forced into looking at something new and more capable earlier than I anticipated.

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