Tag Archives: Fultons Creek

The High Country – Mar 2016

We decided to do a four day Cruise between the Labor Day and Easter weekends, in the hope that things would be fairly quiet on the tracks. As it was, it wasn’t too bad, but there were still a surprising number of vehicles about, especially as the Friday and Saturday were supposed to be wet, very wet as it turned out. Our aim was to head east from the Thomson Dam and make our way to Licola after exploring the area in-between, which we hadn’t done extensively for some time. I think we were given a warning of what to expect as the rain pelted down while I waited at the Moe BP station for our Melbourne travellers to arrive.

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The High Country – Feb 2010

The first Cruise for 2010 saw us head out to the Thomson Reservoir, north of Rawson, where the trip more or less started officially. It was a four day trip and the weather this weekend wasn’t looking all that great when we arrived at the reservoir; however, in this neck of the woods, you can never tell what sort of weather you’ll be getting from one day to the next. Forecasts for Melbourne usually bear no resemblance to what the High Country will get and so it was, as the weekend turned out to be quite a hot and enjoyable event.

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High Country Survival – Stay Alive

When venturing into the High Country, appropriate preparation, knowledge and experience is essential. As I posted earlier about Maps and GPS, knowing where you’re going and how to make alternate plans if the original goes asunder is vital. However, there are other things that are also vital when venturing into the High Country, regardless of the time of year, and that’s having some important and basic equipment with you pretty much all the time. This equipment constitutes not just a reliable and capable vehicle, but also tools, recovery aids, safety gear, first aid gear, personal equipment and supplies that will allow you to survive in the worst of conditions. You often don’t need a lot, but if you leave out even a seemingly minor item, it could be the difference between pleasure and pain on a High Country trip. The thing is, conditions in the High Country can change dramatically in a matter of hours, from warm and dry to freezing cold and wet without any notice, any time of the year.

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