Tag Archives: Butcher Birds

Wattlebirds Are Evil

Wattlebirds have been a long time feature of our backyard and I think we’ve had pretty much the same family, or pair, around since we moved to our country abode. I’ve always thought of them as somewhat timid, nectar eating, birds that prefer to mind their own business as much as possible. How wrong could I be. Wattlebirds are simply evil, spawn of the devil, in the way they have been behaving this last year. And I don’t think it’s anything to do with the virus we’ve experienced since late last year. We have two families as best as I can tell and both are right royal bastards when it comes to the other birds that live and visit our backyard.

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More Backyard Birds

Over the last year, I’ve been giving our backyard birds, those that are meat eaters, a little bit of mince each day just to see how they react. And because we’ve been under COVID lockdown for most of the year, this has become a regular event in the mornings and evenings. The amount of mince that I give them is quite small, no larger than a ping pong ball in size each morning and evening, and this is for four Kookaburras, two Magpies, two Butcher Birds and a Wattlebird, with the occasional Crimson Rosella snaffling a small piece. The birds, naturally, have become quite accustomed to this (though surprisingly quickly) and I now have nearly all of them taking mince from my hand, or when placed very close to me on our veranda balustrade.

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Backyard Critters

This particular page is solely intended to be a record of the various videos that I put together that record the numerous backyard critters that live in and about our backyard. Most are directly from our backyard and others from our metaphorical backyard and surrounds, such as the High Country. There’s no story to be told, just a visual record that I’ll add to from time to time. Hopefully YouTube will remain in existence to retain these videos for a long time to come. One day, in the future, it may provide an informative reference as to what we enjoyed in our rural abode and I hope that future generations will continue to enjoy this wonderful wildlife of ours.

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