Tag Archives: Building

The Veranda Project – Part 3

In Part 2, the internal panelling was completed and now I had to build a base (hearth) for the Chiminea, as the floor couldn’t be left in its current manner. So I went about looking for some suitable tiles that I could lay in the corner and, as luck would have it, National Tiles in Traralgon had just what I needed on discount, so I ended up getting four 600mm2 ceramic tiles. Now the larger the tile the more difficult it can be to lay but, in this instance it was a simple situation so laying four tiles wasn’t a major issue. I was careful to sand down any unevenness in the floorboards before laying down the ceramic tile underlay, making sure that it was nailed down well and then giving it a coating of underlay primer/additive. I thought that 4kg of tile adhesive would have been enough (according to the instructions) but I had to get another 1kg tub to complete the job. I even surprised myself as to how level and even it turned out, though the grouting was a pain to apply.

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The Veranda Project – Part 2

Continuing on from Part 1, with the completion of the external panels, the internal panelling was another aspect that I dwelled on for some time before starting the project. My first thoughts were to use decorative corrugated iron (the small stuff), but it couldn’t be sourced in one metre width (or height depending on how you look at it), which meant buying two metre width and then cutting it but cutting corrugated iron is an utter pain. The second option was pine lining, but it only came in 4.8m lengths, which meant wasting 15m of lining for what I needed (72 x 1m lengths). So as things coalesced, I decided to use cement sheeting on the inside as well, as it was reasonably cheap, could be easily cut to fit the framework, there’d be minimal waste and we could paint it so that the interior would be as light as possible. Ensuring that we didn’t severely reduce the light was an important aspect of this build.

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The Veranda Project – Part 1

Since moving into our country home close to five years ago, one of the most urgent tasks was to put a roof over the veranda, which we did a little while ago; however, there were still aspects that required attention. Firstly, while the veranda was well under one meter from ground level, I didn’t like the fact that it didn’t have a balustrade; as I preferred to err on the side of safety. Secondly, I also wanted to partially enclosure the veranda, because the prevailing weather blows cold wind and rain from one end (see photograph below), and when it’s not raining, leaves take over, producing a constant mess. In the long term, this isn’t good for the veranda and anything within. So with this in mind, we finally got moving on finishing off what we started some time ago.

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Make Something. Anything

Anyone who has watched Mythbusters would know of Adam Savage. Adam is the ADHD counterpart to stoic Jamie Hyneman, two special effects practitioners (and what not) who put their combined experience into a TV show that’s now been running since 2003. I’m a big fan of Mythbusters and how they ‘do’ things in their show when it comes to myth busting; showing how common myths, movie stunts and the like do or do not ring true. In doing so, they often build things from scratch to demonstrate and put the myths to the test. Though, like many fans, I don’t always agree with their testing methods or outcomes.

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The Work Bench

Ever since we moved to the country, my newly acquired Man Cave has been an utter mess, with everything that didn’t fit into the existing two cupboards simply stored in random piles on the floor. This doesn’t make things easy when I want to do some work, as I have no surface to work on, and it creates a habitat for losing things. So I’ve had it in my mind to build a work bench, with an under-bench shelf, out of timber left over from our veranda roofing build. As luck would have it, there was a house demolition happening around the corner the other week and everything was up for sale, which gained me the perfect timber bench top for $5. The top actually came from the laundry, but was of the same type of construction usually used for kitchen bench tops, heavy, laminated timber. After stripping off the unnecessary bits and marking where the frame would go, the project was on.

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