Drifting

As a follow up to my rock stars post, another common item that you find everywhere along the river is driftwood. The driftwood comes in all shapes, styles and sizes, but most are invariably of a similar grey colouration. The driftwood that you find in the High Country is somewhat different from that which you find along beaches, as the weathering effects are clearly not the same. Also, the driftwood is invariably from local trees, not bits and pieces that fall off ships etc (though trees etc can be washed into the oceans and end up anywhere). I have one piece of driftwood (an intricately shaped tree root) collected from this area many years ago that I’ve oiled regularly, giving it a black appearance and which also preserves the wood, but it’s one that I’ve never been able to match so far.

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

The river rocks, along with the water, shape and form the driftwood, and also provide a natural backdrop for the driftwood (for the photographs anyway). Again, this is all a temporary affair as the seasons change constantly, and everything found now is even older and further worn out, come the next season (if the larger pieces happen to be about). As with the river rocks, it’s a never ending cycle. Not all driftwood is that exciting to look at and much depends on the type of tree it comes from, which part of the tree it has come from, and how far and long it’s tumbled around the river. Tree roots often tend to be the most interesting (and I found none this time around).

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

The driftwood also varies in size from tiny fragments to effectively almost whole trees. You can find the driftwood just about anywhere, often lodged amongst the bushes, or even on rocks above the waterline. Some may not even be genuinely classified as driftwood, because they are more or less permanently lodged into the embankments where they were once swept during severe floods. The last two photographs have been converted to a colour/B&W combination, as the background didn’t really complement the colours of the driftwood and was quite messy to boot, so the B&W mellows this a tad.

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood - Goulburn River Victoria

Driftwood – Goulburn River Victoria

Looking for and photographing driftwood (as well as rocks) may not be of interest to everyone, but it kills a few hours while out in the bush, keeps the creative juices flowing (not just the beer) and means that sometimes you can come across something special to take home as a reminder of your holidays, rather than just a phone full of selfies. 😉