Author Archives: Ray

Inline 4 Cafe – Chapter Two

I don’t usually dedicate a story specifically on an individual cafe, other than in my Life Behind Bars series, but in this case I’m making an exception, given the nature of this particular cafe and how it has cemented a major event into our local history. Most motorcycle riders and many other travellers that have passed through Mirboo North over the years will know of the Inline 4 Cafe, which was almost a mandatory stopover for riders. They may also be aware that in 2014 the owners Marcel and Sabine started the Blessing of the Bikes, which has now grown to become a major Victorian motorcycle event that precedes the Victorian Moto GP at Philip Island. That said, things weren’t always smooth riding as I’ve previously written, especially as the Blessing of the Bikes continued to grow, so there came a time when the event had to find a new home. That new home became San Remo, where the first Blessing of the Bikes in 2017 was a resounding success; however, that wasn’t the end of things, as Marcel and Sabine wanted to continue with the Inline 4 Cafe and that too has now found a new home.

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Mirboo North – Closed For Business?

When economic times aren’t at their best, it’s often small towns that suffer the most as businesses close and employment opportunities fall, which in turn tends to create a snowball effect on other businesses. So you generally find that small towns will embrace anyone that is prepared to open a business that will, even if only in a small way, add to the growth and potential of the township and its community. And if someone looks to start something significant in or near the town and genuinely add to the economic growth of the area, most towns will do everything in their power to make sure that the business is welcomed and supported by the community, as well as encouraging the local council to make the development as painless as possible. Sadly, based on recent experience, that doesn’t seem to be the case when it involves Mirboo North and, as much as some would like to believe fairy tales and the like, we are not Hobbiton and those that want to start businesses in town are not Orcs.

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Bushfires

When we moved to our rural abode, one of the first things I enquired about from the local CFA was bushfire emergency planning, prevention and action recommendations applicable to our township. Being a bush travellers for decades, I’m well aware of the risks and safety precautions necessary even in Winter time when camping in the High Country and, while much the same applies in a township, I wanted to make sure whether there were any specifics I needed to be aware of so that I had all bases covered. Additionally, at the beginning of each Summer the CFA issues a number warnings and preparatory information for residents as a reminder that they need to be ever vigilant in the hotter months of the year, as well as having evacuation plans in place should the need ever arise. Having experienced and fought High Country bushfires and all too many times travelled through what remains of the bushfires, I was very cognisant of the potential dangers.

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Making Movies – Part 8

In Part 7 I covered two types of gimbal that you can use with video cameras, static and motorised. In this part I’m going to focus solely on the FeiyuTech a2000 gimbal, some accessories I have for it, and how it can be used in somewhat innovative ways using accessories that any photographer or videographer most likely owns. I’m assuming that every videographer will own at least a tripod and some will also own a slider and If not, this story may provide an incentive to do so. Some of these techniques obviously can apply to all gimbals, but some techniques may not be as easy to emulate, if the gimbal doesn’t have the features that are available on the FeiyuTech a2000 gimbal’s handle (but more on that later). I haven’t noted any blogger/reviewer comment on what I’m about to discuss, so I’m assuming that no one has given any similar thought to how you can make use of gimbals and accessories in different ways than normally envisaged.

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Motorising A Camera Slider

As if this has never been done before! Anyway, in Part 6 of Making Movies I wrote about the slider that I’d bought and noted that I was considering turning it into a motorised slider so that I could get more controlled and smoother motion. What I was achieving wasn’t too bad, but I could never quite get consistent motion across the full length of the slider and that started to become very frustrating. That convinced me even more that I needed to add a motor to the slider. But what really prompted me was when I decided to dismantle one of my old printers, salvaging any useful parts that I could remove, I came across a number of  bits and pieces like motors, belts, brackets, as well as hundreds of small screws. That spurred me to start looking at converting my slider to a motorised one, given the parts that started to pile up.

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1984 – Getting Closer?

While going through the toil and turmoil of trying to understand and get the Android phone working the way I wanted, and address all manner of security and privacy issues, I happened upon an event that made me wonder about technology and how George Orwell’s 1984 novel about a future society may already be here. While looking for an app on my PC, using Google, that would allow my Android phone to be answered more easily than in the standard way, I came across one that might have been the answer. So I then went into the Google Play Store on my phone to search for this app, but when I opened the store, that app came up without asking. That took me aback somewhat, as my PC and phone are not synced, nor had I logged into my Google account on either. That was one of those WTF? moments. It seems that I’m not the only one to experience these moments.

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The Retaining Wall

When we moved into our rural abode seven years ago, the place wasn’t in too bad a shape, but there were some things that beggared belief and, to this day, I can’t understand how these things passed  council approval, if they ever did. The veranda was one aspect (which I still haven’t quite finished), but vastly more significant was the retaining wall along our front driveway. Absolutely no building regulations could have been followed with this pretend retaining wall and the fact that there had been no serious accident (as far as I know) prior to us moving in, is amazing. That retaining wall was constructed of 200mm x 50mm treated-pine sleepers with no concrete foundations, but simply a few 200mm x 50mm sleepers pushed into the ground to hold it up, with a horridly narrow dog-leg in the driveway to make things even more dangerous. I was truly fearful that a car would go too close to the edge and roll over into the not too minor drop below. That was the first thing that needed to be repaired and many thanks to Rob from Evison Concreting and Chris from C&D Earthworks for a great job in fixing this abomination (and for letting me observe and learn something new).

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Making Movies – Part 7

In Part 6 I discussed a range of accessories that can make movie production easier and professional looking. Hand- held gimbals are becoming a major part of this, but the cost of motorised ones had me avoiding getting one. However, after numerous failed attempts at getting the static gimbal to work with my main cameras, I was facing a very frustrating brick wall that I couldn’t penetrate. While the static gimbal is supposed to be able to handle the weight of my cameras (much like a Glidecam), I was beginning to suspect that wasn’t the case. No matter what I did and no matter how many videos I watched on how to balance this gimbal, I could not get it to work. The shoulder rig on the other hand is great but is more a substitute for a tripod in awkward situations but, when moving about, the shoulder rig shows lots of jitter and movement. The more I pondered the subject matter that I would be recording, moving about was going to be a major part of anything that I did and what I had wasn’t going to cut it.

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RunCam 2 – Another Dash Of Action

Sadly, my Mobius 2 camera came to a sudden demise just as I was getting things working so well. I started a warranty claim with the supplier, but then began to have some reservations about how effective this would be, given that I’d purchased the camera from an overseas supplier. So in the interim, I decided to get a RunCam 2 and see how that would perform. Given my comments in my Mobius story, I was hoping that this wasn’t going to be a mistake. The main thing was that from all the video reviews that I’d looked at, the video quality between the Mobius 2 and RunCam 2 was on a par and much especially depended on the user and how they set up the camera and processed the video. After seeing further video comparing the two, I was fairly convinced that there wasn’t going to be any loss in quality, maybe even a gain. And video quality after all is the aim.

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Food Shows

As should be evident to anyone that’s been reading my blog, I love cooking, whether it’s at home, in the bush or even eating out and watching someone else cook. I’m always looking for different ways to make meals enjoyable as well as easy to prepare, so I often watch various food shows on TV and will watch the Food channel on SBS quite frequently. It’s not that I watch all the shows, there are some that I simply dislike, with baking shows being my least favourite. And what person created Cup Cake Wars? I also don’t like pretentious food shows where the host/s use obscure or difficult to source ingredients that require far more skill to prepare than indicated. And I generally dislike any food show that involves competition. I used to enjoy the latter, up to a point, but My Kitchen Rules killed that pleasure after around the third show with their ever increasing emphasis on personality fights rather than cooking. Imagine how pleasant a show it could be if it pitted contestants in good-natured competition.

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