Abandoned

Nothing stays the same, nothing lasts forever and things man-made usually decay the fastest (pyramids etc excluded). The most common abandoned objects found just about anywhere would have to be cars. You can find them in farmer’s paddocks, back and front yards and pretty much wherever a car could have been driven before being abandoned for whatever reason. Sometimes the cars are ordinary, run of the mill hacks, but other times you come across unique cars and wonder why they have been left as they are, to simply rust away. Maybe someone had dreams of restoration, which never eventuated and then didn’t want to part with them until it was too late.

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned car in Erica Victoria

Abandoned crane in Erica

Abandoned crane in Erica

And you’ll find cars, of amazing vintage, in the most unusual of places where access isn’t easy by any means. Even tracks aren’t visible in many cases, which makes you wonder how they got there in the first place and when, let alone why.

Abandoned car - Blackwood Victoria

Abandoned car – Blackwood Victoria

Then of course there are the things that you find in any country scene or neglected reserves and the like, the derelict windmills, water tanks, sheds, ploughs and buildings. These are things that come and go, but often they hang on for years while the elements, or vandals, slowly wear things away until there’s nothing left.

Water Tanks - Werribee Victoria

Water Tanks – Werribee Victoria

Abandoned Toilet Block - Cobbledicks Ford Reserve Werribee Victoria

Abandoned Toilet Block – Cobbledicks Ford Reserve Werribee Victoria

Old Plough - Licola Victoria

Old Plough – Licola Victoria

Of course the mountains are littered with remnants of a bygone era, when men toiled long and hard felling and transporting timber, searching for gold, or herding cattle in and out of the High Country. Many places have a reminder of those times when life was anything but easy.

The Washington Timber Winch - Nunniong Victoria

The Washington Timber Winch – Nunniong Victoria

Gold Mining Dredge - Talbotville Victoria

Gold Mining Dredge – Talbotville Victoria

Gold Mining Dredge - Talbotville Victoria

Gold Mining Dredge – Talbotville Victoria

Mt Terrible Hut - Mt Terrible Victoria

Mt Terrible Hut – Mt Terrible Victoria

And often in the mountains you can find some weird stuff, where someone obviously had a plan, but which clearly never came to be fulfilled. Then there are always the odds and sods left by people who just like to leave things behind.

Bath Tub - Dargo High Plains Victoria

Bath Tub – Dargo High Plains Victoria

Things left in the bush - High Plains Victoria

Things left in the bush – High Plains Victoria

Other places just like to keep a reminder of things old and new, whose usefulness may have come and gone, but still hold memories worth retaining.

Old Hut - Stonehenge Victoria

Old Hut – Stonehenge Victoria

Cars from Midsummer Night's Festival - Stonehenge Victoria

Cars from Midsummer Night’s Festival – Stonehenge Victoria

Some things abandoned are quite memorable and others easy to forget, often insignificant at the time. This is why I like to take photographs of such things, as when you look back, even the seemingly insignificant things can bring back fond memories of places visited and the people that were with you at the time. In a way, deep down, nothing is truly insignificant.

5 thoughts on “Abandoned

  1. David Ruether

    What you show and comment on used to be common in the US, but it is rarely seen now. I have been in all of the 48 contiguous US states (and in some of them many times) in my travels, and what is notable compared with the 1940s and 1950s is how “clean” most of the US now looks. Only in very isolated areas does one find the occasional rusty car hulk or even old food cans or loose paper material. This may be due both to the value as scrap material that old cars now have here (about $300US locally), and to a “neatnick” attitude that developed here decades ago (volunteer roadside “cleaners” are a common sight). I do remember from childhood travels what you describe, and also the “carpet” of broken glass, rusty food cans, and paper that once lined roads in the US. Only the broken glass (that can sparkle beautifully in the sun.as one passes it) remains (in some areas of the southwestern US). Here “barn finds” of old cars are still discovered, and these may become prized exhibits displayed “as-is” in car museums. Perhaps this indicates some nostalgia that may still exist for the sight of such objects in our landscapes.

    –David Ruether

    1. David Ruether

      [The reply just sent has a typo: a period rather than a space between “sun” and “as”…]
      To add:

      Your last line, “In a way, deep down, nothing is truly insignificant.”, is particularly significant for me and for my photography. While I hold that photography is a very inadequate (and deceptive) medium for making records of things, the associations with the subject matter used in photographs can be quite strong, given sufficient skills (and luck) on the part of the photographer. Or, as I often half-jokingly respond with when asked why I photograph some things, “Anything can be used as subject matter in the making of a photograph, even a dog turd!”.

      1. Ray Post author

        Unfortunately in Australia, there doesn’t seem to be a lot of respect from many when it comes to leaving rubbish etc behind. Whenever we go ‘bush’, we bring back everything that can’t be burned in our campfire and usually leave a campsite cleaner than when we arrived. When it comes to other abandoned stuff, especially on farm properties, it’s almost a given that there will be at least one rusting car somewhere in a paddock, visible from a road.

        I often ‘see’ something when we’re out and about, and take a photograph because it captures my interest. Sometimes it can be years before I return to that photo and realise that there’s more to it than when I took the shot. It’s sort of like visualising things subconsciously and it not bubbling to the surface until much later.

  2. David

    Hi

    I have been to Nunniong Victoria and i am pretty sure i didnt see a winch like that.!!!

    Ha Ha

    Great Story

    1. Ray Post author

      Thanks. I seem to remember that you were a tad pre-occupied at the time. 😉

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